BluegrassPoet

A Sporadical Blog

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As to the poetical character itself … it is not itself — it has no self — it is everything and nothing — It as no character — it enjoys light and shade; it lives in gusto, be it foul or fair, high or low, rich or poor, mean or elevated — It has as much delight in conceiving an Iago as an Imogen What shocks the virtuous philosopher, delights the chameleon poet…
John Keats, Letter to Richard Woodhouse, October 27, 1818

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a review of The Woodcarver's Wife

Filed under Woodcarvers Wife poetry review goodreads rodney wilder

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Poetry Giveaway Results

I had, counting those people who “liked” my Giveaway post before I was smart enough to get Disqus set up, 11 entries.

I assigned each entry a number according to the order in which entries were made, first entry #1 and last entry #11.

To determine the winner of Natasha Trethewey’s Thrall, I asked the Random Number Generator to give me a number between one and 11. It picked # 9, Andrew Ty.

To determine the winner of my new book, The Woodcarver’s Wife, I again asked the generator to pick a number between one and 11. This time the number given was 11, Rodney Wilder.

Congratulations winners! I’ll be contacting you by e-mail for contact info.

And thanks to everybody who play along. I hope you’ll visit my tumblr often.

Filed under poetry giveaway natasha trethewey kelli russell agodon

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Oregon Ferry Review

Like all almanacs, Leatha Kendrick’s Almanac of the Invisible begins with “First Week of January”

          A day at home alone, with CNN
          and tea, remnants of the Christmas
          tree, ravenous for unsweet things.

This collection feeds that hunger for the unsweet, for the homely, substantial nutrients of the soul presented in an exquisitely crafted book of equally exquisite poems.

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Oregon Ferry Review

T. Crunk is a fabulist, a Minor Prophet from the last pages of the Old Testament.  James Dickey has called him a “true voyant” (a clairvoyant, a seer). The periods of the King James Bible echo through his work, and his voice in Biblia Pauperum is a cross between Tom of Bedlam and John the Revelator. Or perhaps between the preacher of Ecclesiastes and the mad slave-rebellion leader Nat Turner.

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